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About Sales Configuration Rule Table
Rule tables are used as an easy way to enter one or more straightforward rules. Each rule in a rule table specifies an IF-THEN relationship between variables. You cannot enter rules containing ELSE clauses in a rule table.
A rule table consists of rows and columns. The intersection of a row and a column is called a cell. Row numbers display on the left.

Rule Table
The variables that are involved in the relationships in the table are shown above the columns. Because a rule generally consists of a number of clauses, the type of clause to which the variable belongs is shown as well. Each row of the table corresponds to a single rule. The cells on a particular row specify the values of the variables that make up the rule.
Suppose you have the following two rules.
Rule A:
if coolant = standard
and usage = industrial
then pump = high capacity
and power-converter = standard
 
Rule B:
if coolant = standard
and usage = domestic
then pump = medium capacity
and power-converter = standard
The part of the rule table containing these rules would look like this:
 
 
coolant
IF
usage
IF
pump
THEN
power-converter
THEN
1
standard
industrial
high capacity
standard
2
standard
domestic
medium capacity
standard
Rule A corresponds to row 1 in the rule table, and rule B to row 2.
A rule table can contain one or more conditions (IF variables) and one or more results (THEN variables); the only restriction is that the total number of variables cannot exceed 20. The various clauses that are specified in a table are linked in an AND relationship, as you can see in the previous example. A variable can appear both in the IF clause and in the THEN clause of a single rule table.
An empty cell in an IF clause means that any feature option is OK for the condition.
An empty cell in a THEN clause means that the feature remains as is.
A rule table works only when all features in the IF clauses have values.
Search of a rule table is by the sequence of display. The search stops at the first match; then the system evaluates no further rows.
Apart from its actual value, a variable can also have an extent, a minimum value, a maximum value, and a default value. So, specify the variable-ID and the extent of the variable you want to use in a certain clause of a rule, but also the type of value you are testing for (condition) or manipulating (result). The various types of value are called attributes of the variable. Attributes are displayed after variable IDs in the rule table header. A particular variable, is therefore, characterized by the combination of its ID, its extent, and its attribute. It is in fact this combination that can be used only once in a clause; the same variable with another attribute can be used in the same clause without any problem.
Example:  
 
 
coolant
IF (value)
housing-height
IF (value)
housing-height
THEN (max)
housing-width
THEN (min)
1
standard
200
400
100
2
standard
300
400
200
Rules in a table can only be built from the variables that appear in the table. However, a rule in a table need not use every variable that is available in the table. In other words, a column relating to a variable can have empty cells for one or more rules (rows) in the table.
Note: The rule table functions only check the syntax of the values in the cells. It is possible to enter values that are not in the list of options, and values that are outside the range between the minimum value and the maximum value of a variable. In addition, in the case of item-specific rule tables, it is possible to use variables that are not defined as features for the item. In this way, it is possible to define rule tables for future models.
You can move through the cells of a table in the following way. To move one cell to the right, press the Tab key. To move one cell to the left, press the Tab key while holding down the Shift key. To move one cell up or down, use the up arrow and down arrow cursor keys on the keyboard. Continuing down through a column reveals the rows beyond the originally displayed 12.
The two Rule Table Maintenance functions, General Rule Table Maintenance and Item Rule Table Maintenance, are used in the same way as the basic Rule Maintenance functions.
You can create a general rule table and link it to one or more items afterward without modifying it.
You can link a general rule table to an item and modify it to make it specific for that item.
You can create an item-specific rule table without using a general rule table as a basis.